Related tips and tricks Histamine mast cell activation:


Nutritional needs for male & female infants

...Macronutrients, consisting of carbohydrates, protein and fat, supply your infant with calories to meet the daily EER. Carbohydrates are the primary fuel for cell energy and aid in the proper absorption of protein and fat, which serve as the basic building blocks for organ maturation. All infants from 0 to 6 months need 60 g of daily carbohydrates;... nutritional needs for male & female infants

Ways to ruin a first date

...Lack of funds with a woman you'd like to take home. Although she may not judge you negatively for being broke, a woman wants to feel that she (and the bill) will be taken care of if she sticks with you.8. Answering your cell phoneRegularly answering cell phone calls (especially from other women) while you are out together with... ways to ruin a first date

Advice to avoid being a victim of crime

...Away who isn?t supposed to be there because the burglar will think you turned on the light. If you are worried about someone cutting your phone cord or telephone line before your house is burglarized, keep a cell phone with you so you can call out no matter what happens with your landline. If you have an old cell phone, you can still dial 9-1-1 and get help even if you are not... advice to avoid being a victim of crime

Tips to get your kid out of detention

...This tip will basically work if you have a cell phone. When entering the office to speak with the principal/vice principal/teacher/etc. Have someone call you on your cell pohne and hang up when you pick up.For parents ONLY, Say something... tips to get your kid out of detention

Cell phone use while driving – safety tips

...Global usage of cell phones has been increasing at an alarming pace for the past two decades or so. We have witnessed the fixed line phones being replaced to a great extend by mobile phones for... cell phone use while driving ? safety tips



Google plus public talk:


Did my illness ce my children to have acid reflux as infants?As I have learned more and more about mast cell activation disorders and the role of histamine in the body, I have pondered many things about my past.  I have breastfed all of my children and all of my children have had vari levels of acid reflux or GERD...


What You Should Know About Histamine Intolerance - Chris Kresser"You can get your diamine oxidase levels tested actually. It’s a serum test. So you can get diamine oxidase. You can get serum histamine tested. Serum tryptase, T-R-Y-P-T-A-S-E, is considered one of the most sensitive markers for mast cell activation syndro...




He/she talks: Histamine intolerance, mast cell disorder & allergies supplements (pt 2)
Part two - natural antihistamine and mast cell stabilising supplements for histamine intolerance, mast cell disorders and allergies.


Leukocytes ~ macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells - macrophages = phagocytose pathogen and then act as antigen presenting cell. - neutrophils = Polymorphonuclear leukocytes = PMNs = phagocytose pathogen and destroys it. - mast cells: release histamine during an allergic response, bring about inflammation. - natural killer cells: kills infected/abnormal cells. - dendritic cells: the best antigen presenting cells. T-lymphocytes - Matures in the Thymus. - Cytotoxic T cells recognize antigen on infected cells, and signal for apoptosis. - Helper T cells recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells, and signal for activation of B cells, T cells, and macrophages. B-lymphocytes, plasma cells - Matures in Bone marrow. - B cells form plasma cells and memory cells when exposed to antigen. - Plasma cells = secrete Antibody. - Memory cells = stick around in case the same Antigen attacks in the future. Tissues Spleen - Provides a site for WBCs to reside and proliferate. - Removes pathogens from blood. - Removes old RBCs and platelets. Thymus: T lymphocytes differentiate in the thymus. Lymph nodes - Provide a site for WBCs to reside and proliferate. - Removes pathogens from lymph. - Residing lymphocytes monitor lymph for foreign antigens, and initiate an immune response when exposed to foreign antigens. Basic aspects of innate immunity and inflammatory response: INNATE immunity= first line of defense = kills anything that doesn’t look right = not specific to a particular pathogen / antigen - Skin: natural flora, layer of keratin. - Mucus membranes: traps pathogen in mucus, and cilia moves it out. - Phagocytes: engulf pathogen. - Natural killer cells: destroy infected cells. - Antimicrobial proteins: tears (lyse bacteria), interferons (interfere with virus replication), complement (punches holes in cell/pathogen membrane). ~Fever/inflammation: WBCs are more active at higher temperature, and inflammation recruits WBCs to site of infection by sending out chemical signals and making capillaries more permeable. ADAPTIVE immunity = highly specific for a particular pathogen / antigen. - Antigen presenting cells present foreign antigen on their surface. - Antigen is recognized by T and B cells. - Cytotoxic T cells kill infected cells. - Helper T cells Activate Macrophages, T and B cells. - B cells produce AntiBodies. - AntiBodies bind to antigens and bring about: ~~ Neutralization: pathogen can’t adhere to host cell ~~ Opsonization: makes it easier for phagocytosis ~~ Complement activation: kills infected cell by punching holes in cell membrane. - Memory cells are made that are much more efficient (does NOT need T cell activation) in proliferating and making antibodies in case the same infection strikes in the future. - Memory cells allow the body to mount a greater, and more sustained response against the same pathogen during secondary response. Concept of Antigen and Antibody - AntiBody = lock, Antigen = key. Each antibody is specific to the binding of an antigen. - AntiBody is like a Y, the tips of the fork bind antigen. - The tips of the fork are called hypervariable regions because they are unique to each antigen-specific antibody. - The AntiBody consists of 2 light chains and 2 heavy chains linked together by disulfide bonds. Mechanism of stimulation by antigen; antigen presentation - pathogen enters antigen-presenting-cell (APC) - pieces of the pathogen gets displayed at the surface of APCs. - T cell receptors recognize the presented antigen, and activates various immune responses. scenario 1: EXTRAcellular pathogen 1. Macrophage engulfs pathogen. 2. pieces of the pathogen becomes the antigen and gets presented at the macrophage’s cell surface. 3. Helper T cells recognize the presented antigen, and Activates Macrophages to destroy pathogen. Helper T cells also Activate B cells to produce antibodies against the pathogen. scenario 2: INTRAcellular pathogen 1. pathogen invades host cell. 2. pieces of the pathogen gets presented on the host cell surface. 3. Cytotoxic T cells recognize the presented antigen, and signals the infected cell to self-destruct.

10352142_810807905616533_6616811071075218575_n.jpgDate: Jan 19, 2015, 5:24 PM
Number of Comments on Photo:0

View Photo



Leukocytes ~ macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells - macrophages = phagocytose pathogen and then act as antigen presenting cell. - neutrophils = Polymorphonuclear leukocytes = PMNs = phagocytose pathogen and destroys it. - mast cells: release histamine during an allergic response, bring about inflammation. - natural killer cells: kills infected/abnormal cells. - dendritic cells: the best antigen presenting cells. T-lymphocytes - Matures in the Thymus. - Cytotoxic T cells recognize antigen on infected cells, and signal for apoptosis. - Helper T cells recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells, and signal for activation of B cells, T cells, and macrophages. B-lymphocytes, plasma cells - Matures in Bone marrow. - B cells form plasma cells and memory cells when exposed to antigen. - Plasma cells = secrete Antibody. - Memory cells = stick around in case the same Antigen attacks in the future. Tissues Spleen - Provides a site for WBCs to reside and proliferate. - Removes pathogens from blood. - Removes old RBCs and platelets. Thymus: T lymphocytes differentiate in the thymus. Lymph nodes - Provide a site for WBCs to reside and proliferate. - Removes pathogens from lymph. - Residing lymphocytes monitor lymph for foreign antigens, and initiate an immune response when exposed to foreign antigens. Basic aspects of innate immunity and inflammatory response: INNATE immunity= first line of defense = kills anything that doesn’t look right = not specific to a particular pathogen / antigen - Skin: natural flora, layer of keratin. - Mucus membranes: traps pathogen in mucus, and cilia moves it out. - Phagocytes: engulf pathogen. - Natural killer cells: destroy infected cells. - Antimicrobial proteins: tears (lyse bacteria), interferons (interfere with virus replication), complement (punches holes in cell/pathogen membrane). ~Fever/inflammation: WBCs are more active at higher temperature, and inflammation recruits WBCs to site of infection by sending out chemical signals and making capillaries more permeable. ADAPTIVE immunity = highly specific for a particular pathogen / antigen. - Antigen presenting cells present foreign antigen on their surface. - Antigen is recognized by T and B cells. - Cytotoxic T cells kill infected cells. - Helper T cells Activate Macrophages, T and B cells. - B cells produce AntiBodies. - AntiBodies bind to antigens and bring about: ~~ Neutralization: pathogen can’t adhere to host cell ~~ Opsonization: makes it easier for phagocytosis ~~ Complement activation: kills infected cell by punching holes in cell membrane. - Memory cells are made that are much more efficient (does NOT need T cell activation) in proliferating and making antibodies in case the same infection strikes in the future. - Memory cells allow the body to mount a greater, and more sustained response against the same pathogen during secondary response. Concept of Antigen and Antibody - AntiBody = lock, Antigen = key. Each antibody is specific to the binding of an antigen. - AntiBody is like a Y, the tips of the fork bind antigen. - The tips of the fork are called hypervariable regions because they are unique to each antigen-specific antibody. - The AntiBody consists of 2 light chains and 2 heavy chains linked together by disulfide bonds. Mechanism of stimulation by antigen; antigen presentation - pathogen enters antigen-presenting-cell (APC) - pieces of the pathogen gets displayed at the surface of APCs. - T cell receptors recognize the presented antigen, and activates various immune responses. scenario 1: EXTRAcellular pathogen 1. Macrophage engulfs pathogen. 2. pieces of the pathogen becomes the antigen and gets presented at the macrophage’s cell surface. 3. Helper T cells recognize the presented antigen, and Activates Macrophages to destroy pathogen. Helper T cells also Activate B cells to produce antibodies against the pathogen. scenario 2: INTRAcellular pathogen 1. pathogen invades host cell. 2. pieces of the pathogen gets presented on the host cell surface. 3. Cytotoxic T cells recognize the presented antigen, and signals the infected cell to self-destruct.

1910147_810807762283214_6855943361678878794_n.jpgDate: Jan 19, 2015, 5:24 PM
Number of Comments on Photo:0

View Photo



Mast Cells: The Key to Multiple Sclerosis? Mast cells are present in high numbers in the border-zones of the multiple sclerosis-plaques. They are located in small clusters along capillaries and venules, and they are more abundant in females than in men. Mast cells can be stimulated to release specific mediators such as histamine, resulting in oedema formation, as well as proteases that may cause demyelination, by several different activation mechanisms. We hypothesize that a putative mast cell activation may be induced by diet factor(s) as well as long lasting mental stress that may lead to the release of catestatin, as well as ACTH released from the pituitary gland. Given a natural flux of mast cell recovery and activation, a putative phenomenon of massive release of mediators and “silent” reload periods may explain the relapsing-remitting phases of multiple sclerosis. More information can be found in the following link: http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=45101&utm_campaign=linkedin&utm_medium=zc #neuroscience  

88.jpgDate: Feb 5, 2007, 10:32 AM
Number of Comments on Photo:0

View Photo





Histamine mast cell activation on Delicious's talk

FDA: First Drug to Treat Cancer in Dogs Approved
Sitefinder Mobile Phone Base Station Database
Mast cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mast Cell Tumors
The Mastocytosis Society: Mast Cell Disorders Explained
Mast cell tumors
College of Veterinary Medicine
Pet Owner's Crash Course in Canine Mast Cell Tumors

Key phrases:
Mast cell Histamine Mast Cell


Related hot talk Histamine Mast Cell Activation:

Histamine Receptors Antagonist | Histamine Receptor Antagonist Drugs | Histamine Receptor Antagonist Mechanism Of Action | Histamine Receptor Antagonist Side Effects | Histamine Receptor Antagonist For Gerd | Histamine Mast Cell Activation Website | Histamine Mast Cell Activation